J. Terry Laws, Attorney, LLC
8 Whitsett Street
Greenville, SC 29601
Phone: 864-370-9040
Fax: 864-370-1281
Email: terrylaws@jtlawsfirm.net

Hours of Operation:
Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00pm

Wills, Trusts, and Estates

Planning for the future security of your family and estate is a task best tackled sooner rather than later and an attorney competent in the execution of wills, trusts and estates can best help you find your way through otherwise confusing territory.

How do you get started? Here are a few things to consider prior to meeting with your chosen attorney:

? Choose an executor for your estate that you trust to handle your assets and make sure he or she is willing participate.

? Don't assume you have a will because your spouse has one - each of you must create your own will to cover your personal, individual assets.

? Assess your assets and figure out which property is best suited for your will and which might be better suited for passing to your family in another way, by-passing probate, such as a living trust.

? Decide who will inherit the property or other assets.

? If you have young children, decide who you will name as their guardian and who will manage any property or other assets left to them until the reach adulthood.

Once your will has been created in partnership with your attorney, store it is a safe place and be sure your executor knows the location and how to access it.

You might also consider the option of creating a living trust (this means that you set it up while alive) as a part of your estate plan, as benefits can be realized while you are alive. A living trust manages your assets both before and after your death and allows for the disbursements of the property at the appropriate time by the trustee.

A trust is not a matter of public record. It remains private at the time of your death and is not subject to probate proceedings, two key factors that differentiate a trust from a will. You have the option to act as trustee of your own trust estate while you are able to do so, rather than relying on the provisions in your will. A trust can also be an effective tool for asset protection prior to your death and after, since, as a general rule, the trust property doesn't pass under your will and is not subject to the debts of your estate.

A trust has many uses other than as a means of providing for distribution of assets. It can enable you to provide for the health and welfare of a loved one prior to and after your death. Talk to your attorney about the best course of action for your personal estate, as he can advise you of all of your options and help you find your best plan of action for preserving your estate and providing for your family.